Study

Reversal of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and New Wound Incidence: The Role of MIRE

AT A GLANCE

PURPOSE: To determine if improved foot sensitivity originally impaired because of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, might be associated with a reduced incidence of new diabetic foot wounds.

PATIENT(S): Sixty-eight individuals over age 64 with diabetes, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and loss of protective sensation who had clinically demonstrable increases in foot sensation after treatment with monochromatic near infrared photo energy (MIRE).

RESULTS: After reversal of diabetic peripheral neuropathy following treatment with monochromatic near infrared photo energy, only 1 of 68 patients developed a new diabetic foot wound, for an incidence of 1.5%. Comparatively, the incidence previously reported in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes was 7.3%.

CONCLUSIONS: Improved foot sensitivity in patients previously suffering from loss of protective sensation due to diabetic neuropathy appears to be associated with a lower incidence of new diabetic foot ulcers when compared with the expected incidence in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes. Therefore, Therapeutic interventions that effectively improve foot sensitivity that has been previously diminished due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy may substantially reduce the incidence of new foot wounds in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes.